If you’re an event organizer, host, or manager looking to move your in-person event into the virtual world, there are a few key differences to keep in mind as you move forward with your planning process.

Image for post
Image for post

I’m a virtual event producer who moved from managing mascots, dance cams, and DJs at live sporting events to creating fun and engaging virtual events.

Watch the entire video on YouTube or scroll down for the summarized key takeaways.

1. Your Attendees Location

At in-person events, you’re controlling the attendees’ location because they come to you but in the virtual event space, you can control what the…


This has been the longest time I’ve been in the U.S. since I graduated. Right after college, I hopped on a plane to China. My original plan was to live there for 6 months to a year, explore the country, and solidify my Chinese language knowledge. I’d majored in Chinese but lacked the confidence to continue practicing if I’d stayed in the U.S. I figured that if I was ever going to use the language it would be in the country itself.

Image for post
Image for post

Fast forward to five years later and I’d established a life in Shanghai and was fully immersed in…


As we settle into the new normal of Zoom calls, remote meetings, and virtual events, it can feel like everything is changing about how we meet, gather, and celebrate.

Image for post
Image for post

But no matter what platform, medium, or formatting we use moving forward, one element will stay the same, no matter what.

You need a Run of Show.

Used by directors, conferences creators, event venues, planners, and more, a Run of Show (ROS) is a tool used at any and every event. It breaks down the timing, programming, and content for every minute of an event. At a professional basketball game, the ROS lets the DJ, light operator, and MC know exactly when to do the player introductions during pre-game. The ROS lets the couple know the order their bridal party should process down the aisle. The ROS lets the chef know what time dessert is being served.

The Run of Show acts as a the map for…


Transitioning your in-person event to virtual is a challenge. Learn how espnW made it look easy.

Image for post
Image for post

The annual espnW Summit NYC went virtual this year, offering an entire afternoon of content for free. It consisted of over three hours of programming, featuring female on-screen talent and professional athletes. Leading up to the event, espnW promised: “to make you smile, think, and feel the W love!”

Now virtual events are very different from in-person events. In the virtual world, you’re competing against at-home distractions and challenged to create connections through a screen, all while providing value to your attendees.

Somehow, espnW nailed it. They are one of the few organizations completely delivered on their pre-event promise and…


Planning an event can be overwhelming. Your job could include everything from picking the event theme, format, venue, decor, entertainment, and more.

No matter if you’re planning a wedding, birthday party, company gala, non-profit fundraiser, or a live sporting event, it’s easy to get lost in the event planning process.

It’s hard to know how to make some of the hundreds of decisions that come with event planning or even where to start. That is one of the biggest roles an event planner plays: being the decision-maker.

It sounds simple but it’s not.

Image for post
Image for post

The most common mistake I see with event organizers and planners is that they lose focus on the why behind their event. …


You might be planning your first event or your 100th, but no matter the event, virtually or in-person, you need an event budget.

An event budget takes into account all of the money being made and spent around the event. This includes your ticket sales, sponsorships, venue, food and beverage, decor, designs, marketing, technology, staffing, etc.

Already feeling overwhelmed by all the little details of hosting an event? Your budget can act as your blueprint to help you navigate all those challenges and details, keeping you on track to getting where you want to go.

Image for post
Image for post

Whenever I start working on an event, the event budget is the first thing that I look at. If the event is an annual one, I can look…


I love live sports: the atmosphere, the emotions of the players, the energy of the crowd, free t-shirts, stadium hotdogs, you name it. There’s something special about watching sports in person, a luxury we don’t have right now.

Image for post
Image for post

While we all are feeling the impact of life without live sports, let’s take a look at the elements and people that make live sports so much fun.

Depending on the team, league, or organization, this group of people falls into the category called Game Day Presentation, Special Events, Fan Experience, or Sports Presentation. …


We’ve all had those projects that fill you with dread and nerves before they’ve even started. Your voice inside is saying I can’t do this. How did I get this role/project when I know I can’t do it.

We want to be in our comfort zones, that safe, predictable place where we can work, hang out, and even snuggle up in. While we love our comfort zones, if we continue to stay there, we will hit a limit in how much we can learn.

The most dramatic learning and growing often happen when we step outside of that comfort zone.


Image for post
Image for post

Nearly every event is run by a team. It could be a two-person team or a 1,000 member team but event management is rarely a solo role. As an event manager, you’ll frequently find yourself in charge of other people. While planning the rundown, inventory list, or floor plan might be second nature to you, managing people requires an entirely different skill set.

Last year, I worked multiple sporting events in China where I managed both large and small teams. Our work scope was everything from VIP hospitality to logistics, transportation, and game presentation.

The most challenging event was where…


I started crying in a stall in the women’s bathroom. I’d gone in with the intention to just pee and get back out there but I found myself suddenly crying in the stall, tears slowing making their way down my face.

I wasn’t wailing or stamping my feet like a toddler, but I was crying and I was at work. It was happening. I was crying at work.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jessica Knowlden on Unsplash

Crying at work usually divides people into two categories — those that think it’s ok to do and those who believe that you should never do it, not ever. …

Logan Clements

Athlete and event manager with a love for sports, travel, and good food 🇺🇸➡️🇨🇳➡️ 🌏 Independent Event Coordinator and Founder of Logan Strategy Group

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store